Euro Dressage News Notes - Dutch Team Riders Go for 2010 Dutch Championships After Exceptional Rule Change


The Dutch team riders will be competing at the 2010 Dutch Championships in De Steeg, The Netherlands on 9 - 13 June 2010 after all. The Dutch Equestrian Federation (KNHS) has changed the rules for the Championship formula which enables team riders to include the championships in their competition schedule. At the World Cup Finals in 's Hertogenbosch, Dutch chef d'equipe Sjef Janssen announced that the Dutch WEG selection trials would be the CDIO Rotterdam (16 - 20 June) and the CDI Hickstead (July). As the Dutch nationals are only one week before Rotterdam, most team riders admitted they would not be showing their top horses at the event.
To accommodate the wishes of the organizers of the Championships to attract the big league combinations, the KNHS changed the champion formula for once for this special occasion. All A and B-team riders are allowed to waive the first championship round (Grand Prix) and only need to compete in the Special and Kur to Music.

Riders who are not part of the A or B team have to ride the Grand Prix as a qualifier for the next two rounds. Sixteen riders will enter the Grand Prix Special, twelve the Kur to Music. Only the scores of the Special and Kur will be totaled to determine the overall Dutch Champion. Read More

Mosaic, Torch Bearer for Dressage in Australia
Some Europeans might have rubbed their eyes when they saw Mosaic, a diminutive horse with a rather tall lady aboard, for the first time. Carrying the Australian flag on the saddle pad they seemed to go on with a tradition that started in 1980 when Australia sent a dressage rider to the Olympics for the first time. The country continued to do so with little success until the 1990s. Initially nobody assumed that this liver chestnut would change Australia’s reputation from rather exotic dressage country to a nation seriously devoted to the discipline. The story of Mosaic is proof that one could ride on a half pony, come from down under and yet be serious about international competition.

Mosaic was born in New Zealand in 1983 and is an offspring of Witzbold, one of the first imported Hanoverian sires in this country. His father was well bred by Winnetou out of a Lungau mare and went on to sire several other dressage horses in kiwi country, which competed internationally, e.g. Mosaic’s full brother Playskool.

Mosaic’s dam was a pony size mare by Sharam ox, so in the end Mosaic was standing barely 160 cm and missed the big lines of a typical European warmblood. He became a registered NZ Hanoverian and his breeder Eric Ropiha, a well-known horseman in New Zealand, sold him as a 3 ½ years old to Sharon Field, one of the country’s first international dressage riders. Read More




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